Home Remedies for Menstrual Cramps



As women, we all know it, dread it, and are sometimes even thankful that we get it — I'm talking about our monthly period. We all know the constant throbbing and cramping pains that come with it. According to the Mayo Clinic, your uterus contracts to help expel its lining during your period. Hormone-like substances, called prostaglandins, which are involved in pain and inflammation, trigger the uterine muscle contractions. Higher levels of prostaglandins are therefore associated with more severe menstrual cramps. For some women, their cramps might even interfere with their work, school, and daily activities. About three out of four women experience menstrual pains, and every one out of 10 women experiences severe cramps.
To help you get through the monthly visit, here are some home remedies that ease menstrual cramps.

Exercise
This might sound a little crazy and you might be thinking to yourself, I can barely move, let alone exercise. However, brisk walking, or any type of physical activity, can help to ease your belly pain. When you're doing any type of aerobic exercise, your body is pumping more blood; this helps to release endorphins to counteract the prostaglandins and reduce your cramps. Exercising three to four times a week is good for the overall health of your body, but it is especially important if you're prone to painful menstrual cramps.
Drink chamomile teaA study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Chemistry found that there might be pain-relieving properties in this fragrant tea. "This is one of a growing number of studies that provide evidence that commonly used natural products really do contain chemicals that may be of medicinal value," said Elaine Holmes, Ph.D., a chemist with the Imperial College of London. The research found that when 14 participants were given urine samples, their urinary levels had a significant increase in hippurate, which is a natural anti-inflammatory. Anti-inflammatory drugs help to decrease the prostaglandin production, thus relieving menstrual cramps.

 Make sure you're getting enough vitamin D
Prevention is always better than the cure, which is why making sure your body has enough vitamin D is important in preventing menstrual cramps. A study found that high doses of vitamin D3 led to a significant decrease in menstrual cramps. As reported by Health.com, "40 Italian women were split into two groups: one receiving a single oral dose of 300,000 IUs of vitamin D3 and the other getting a placebo five days before the expected start of their menstrual periods." Their pain scored dropped by 41 percent, while those in the placebo group saw no change in their pain scale.

 Have an orgasm       
Yes, that's right — orgasms help to relieve all kinds of pain, including menstrual cramps. Before an orgasm, the uterus is more relaxed, and at the moment of climax, blood flow increases, helping to relieve the cramps. Orgams relieve the pain through the release of endorphins, which help you to feel instantly better. They also help to relax your whole body and induce sleep so you won't feel any cramping at all.

 Acupuncture
Acupuncture is a component of traditional Chinese medicine, which involves sticking the skin with small needles to stimulate the body at certain points. Researchers from the Oriental Hospital at Kyung Hee University Medical Center in South Korea found that acupuncture might have positive effects on menstrual cramps. The study was based on 10 trials with 944 participants. "There was an improvement in pain relief from acupressure compared with a placebo control," according to the study.


Water

It sounds odd, but drinking water keeps your body from retaining water and helps to avoid painful bloating during menstruation. Warm or hot water is usually better for cramps, as hot liquids increase blood flow to the skin and may relax cramped muscles. You can also eat water-based foods to increase your hydration, including:
  • lettuce
  • celery
  • cucumbers
  • watermelon
  • berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)

Calcium

Calcium can help reduce muscle cramping during menstruation. The Mayo Clinic recommends 1,000 mg per day for women between the ages of 19-50. Foods high in calcium include:
  • dairy products
  • sesame seeds
  • almonds
  • leafy green vegetables
Calcium is also available in supplement form. However, you should speak to your doctor before taking supplements to find out if it’s safe for you.

Papaya

Papaya contains carotene plus high amounts of vitamins C and A, as well as lower amounts of iron and calcium. This wonder fruit is low in calories and high in nutritional value, is good for the skin, and aids in digestion.


More Foods to Eat

Poor nutrition can lead to deficiencies that can worsen menstruation symptoms, so stock up on foods packed with essential vitamins and nutrients, including the following:
  • brown rice (contains vitamin B6, which may reduce bloating)
  • walnuts, almonds, and pumpkin seeds (rich in manganese, which eases cramps)
  • olive oil and broccoli (contain vitamin E)
  • chicken, fish, and leafy green vegetables (contain iron, which is lost during menstruation)


















Foods to Avoid

During menstruation, it’s a good idea to avoid foods that cause bloating and water retention. Some of the biggest culprits include:
  • fatty foods
  • alcohol
  • carbonated beverages

Heat

Applying heat to your abdomen and lower back may relieve pain as effectively as medicine. If you don’t have a hot water bottle or heating pad, take a warm bath or use a hot towel. Or, you can make your own heating pad by following the instructions below:
  1. Cut and sew together two pieces of fabric, leaving a hole at the top.
  2. Fill with rice and sew up the hole.
  3. Microwave for a few minutes to desired temperature. Do not overheat!
  4. Let cool, if necessary. Or wrap rice bag in a towel to reduce heat transfer. Reuse as necessary
Powered by Blogger.