FIDEL CASTRO THANKS CUBA, CRITICIZES BACK OBAMA, ON 90TH BIRTHDAY




Fidel Castro thanked Cubans for their well-wishes on his 90th birthday and criticized President Barack Obama in a lengthy letter published in state media. 
He appeared but did not speak at a gala in his honor broadcast on state television.
‘I want to express my deepest gratitude for the shows of respect, greetings and praise that I’ve received in recent days, which give me strength to reciprocate with ideas that I will send to party militants and relevant organizations,’ he wrote about his birthday on Saturday.
‘Modern medical techniques have allowed me to scrutinize the universe,’ wrote Castro, who stepped down as Cuba’s president ten years ago after suffering a severe gastrointestinal illness.
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Cuba's former President Fidel Castro attends a gala for his 90th birthday at the 'Karl Marx' theater in Havana, Cuba on Saturday
Cuba’s former President Fidel Castro attends a gala for his 90th birthday at the ‘Karl Marx’ theater in Havana, Cuba on Saturday
Fidel Castro greets a little girl with pink glasses during a ceremony for his 90th birthday
Fidel Castro greets a little girl with pink glasses during a ceremony for his 90th birthday
Just after 6pm, he could be seen in footage on state television slowly approaching his seat at Havana’s Karl Marx theater, clad in a white Puma tracksuit top and green shirt. 
He sat in what appeared to be a specially equipped wheelchair and watched a musical tribute by a children’s theater company, accompanied by footage of highlights from his decades in power.
He sat alongside his younger brother, President Raul Castro, and President Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela, along with Cuba’s highest-ranking military and civilian officials.
In his letter, Castro accompanied his thanks with reminiscences about his childhood and youth in eastern Cuba, describing the geology and plant life of the region where he grew up. 
He touched on his father’s death shortly before his own victory in overthrowing US-backed strongman Fulgencio Batista in 1959.
Castro, center right, attends a gala for his 90th birthday accompanied by his brother and current President Raul, center left, and Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro, right
Castro, center right, attends a gala for his 90th birthday accompanied by his brother and current President Raul, center left, and Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro, right
Castro (left), Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro (center) and Venezuelan First Lady Cilia Flores (right) clap as they attend a ceremony for Fidel Castro's 90th birthday
Castro (left), Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro (center) and Venezuelan First Lady Cilia Flores (right) clap as they attend a ceremony for Fidel Castro’s 90th birthday
Castro appears fascinated at his birthday's entertainment as he sits in the center of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro (third from left) and Cuban President Raul Castro (left)
Castro appears fascinated at his birthday’s entertainment as he sits in the center of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro (third from left) and Cuban President Raul Castro (left)
Castro returns at the end to criticize Obama, who appeared to anger the revolutionary leader with a March trip to Cuba in which he called for Cubans to look toward the future. 
A week after the trip, Castro wrote a sternly worded letter admonishing Obama to read up on Cuban history, and declaring that ‘we don’t need the empire to give us anything.’
In Saturday’s letter, he criticizes Obama for not apologizing to the Japanese people during a May trip to Hiroshima, describing Obama’s speech there as ‘lacking stature.’
A Cuban flag hangs across a street in Havana for the low key celebration of Castro's birthday - there are no massive rallies or parades planned, no publicly announced visits from global dignitaries
A Cuban flag hangs across a street in Havana for the low key celebration of Castro’s birthday – there are no massive rallies or parades planned, no publicly announced visits from global dignitaries
Posters with the portrait of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro, Cuban President Raul Castro, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro and late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez hang in a butcher shop in Havana
Posters with the portrait of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro, Cuban President Raul Castro, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro and late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez hang in a butcher shop in Havana
The Cuban government has taken a relatively low-key approach to Castro’s birthday, in comparison with the large-scale gatherings that had been planned for his 80th. 
Along with the Saturday evening gala, government ministries have held small musical performances and photo exhibitions that pay tribute to the former head of state.
Castro last appeared in public in April, closing the twice-a-decade congress of the Communist Party with a call for Cuba to stick to its socialist ideals amid ongoing normalization with the US.
A poster of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro is seen on a wall in Havana during his 90th birthday celebration 
A poster of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro is seen on a wall in Havana during his 90th birthday celebration 
A poster of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro is seen fixed on the counter of a state rationing store or bodega as people do their shopping in central Havana
A poster of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro is seen fixed on the counter of a state rationing store or bodega as people do their shopping in central Havana
Street art created around the Cuban national flag and the commander in chief military cap of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro is seen in Havana
Street art created around the Cuban national flag and the commander in chief military cap of Cuban Revolution leader Fidel Castro is seen in Havana
The need for closer economic ties with the US has grown more urgent as Venezuela, Castro’s greatest ally, tumbles into economic free-fall, cutting the flow of subsidized oil that Cuba has depended on the South American country for more than a decade. 
Meanwhile, tens of thousands of Cubans are migrating to the United States, hollowing out the ranks of highly educated professionals.
The brightest spot in Cuba’s flagging economy has been a post-detente surge in tourism that is expected to boom when commercial flights to and from the United States, Cuba’s former longtime enemy, resume on August 31.
A poster with the image of the Cuban leader Fidel Castro is reflected on a mirror, right, as a TV shows the Rio Olympic Games at a house in Havana
A poster with the image of the Cuban leader Fidel Castro is reflected on a mirror, right, as a TV shows the Rio Olympic Games at a house in Havana
A sign that reads in Spanish: 'Fidel is and will be conscience and thought line,' is fixed on the window of a state housing office in Havana
A sign that reads in Spanish: ‘Fidel is and will be conscience and thought line,’ is fixed on the window of a state housing office in Havana

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