TOURISTS IN ITALY WARNED THAT SAVING A BEACH SPOT NOW ILLEGAL IN SOME PARTS

Getting a prime position on the beach is a top priority for many holidaymakers who want to make the most of their time in the sun.
But coast guards around Italy are cracking down on beachgoers who are getting there early, sometimes even the night before, to save a spot.
As well as confiscating any beach chairs and loungers left overnight, the coast guards are issuing fines of €200 (£170) in some parts of the country.
Coast guards around Italy are cracking down on people saving a spot on the beach with their towels and deckchairs (file photo)
Coast guards around Italy are cracking down on people saving a spot on the beach with their towels and deckchairs (file photo)
‘Operation Safe Sea’, as it’s being called by Italian newspaper La Repubblica, is already in effect up and down the country. 
In Livorno for example, 37 deck chairs, 30 umbrellas, a cot, several towels and even swimwear were removed by coast guards from the beach on Saturday.
They occupied around 100m of the public beach.
It’s not just one individual who was involved – dozens of people are said to have been the owners of these items.
And for those who have had their belongings confiscated, they will need to pay the fine of €200 (£170) to get their possessions back, according to the report.
There were also incidences of tourists being duped by individuals who charge them to use the deckchairs.
In Livorno, 37 deck chairs, 30 umbrellas, a cot, several towels and even swimwear were removed by coast guards from the beach on Saturday (file photo)
In Livorno, 37 deck chairs, 30 umbrellas, a cot, several towels and even swimwear were removed by coast guards from the beach on Saturday (file photo)
The rules appear to vary from place to place.
For example, the city of Cecina only forbids leaving ‘equipment unattended before 8.30am’ and has made it illegal.
While it doesn’t appear as though anyone has paid the fine or has been arrested yet, the coast guards hope the crackdown will help reduce the ‘widespread malpractice’ of saving space on the beach.
A representative told Tgcom24: ‘One of the objectives is to protect the community from all forms of abuse which limits the right of use [of] the sea and the beaches.’
MailOnline Travel has contacted the Italian Coast Guard and the Italian Tourist Board for comment. 

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